Programme (Online)

The Asian Conference on Ethics, Religion & Philosophy (ACERP) is an interdisciplinary conference held alongside The Asian Conference on Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences (ACP). Keynote, Featured and Spotlight Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. Registration for either conference will allow participants to attend sessions in both.

This page provides details of presentations and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


Conference Outline

Tuesday, March 29, 2022Wednesday, March 30, 2022Thursday, March 31, 2022Virtual Presentations

All times are Japan Standard Time (UTC+9)
Use our time converter tool to show times in your timezone.

15:00-15:10: Announcements, Recognition of IAFOR Scholarship Winners, Welcome Address
Joseph Haldane, IAFOR, Japan

15:10-16:10: Keynote Presentation
The Rehabilitation of a Buddhist Heretic
Brian Victoria, Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies, United Kingdom

16:10-16:20: Break

16:20-17:20: Keynote Presentation
Religion and COVID 19 in the United States: The Good, the Bad, and the Shocking
Frank Ravitch, Michigan State University College of Law, United States

17:20-17:30: Break

17:30-18:30: Keynote Presentation
Successful Prophecy? Jehovah’s Witnesses and COVID-19
George Chryssides, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom

18:30-18:40: Break

18:40-19:40: Moderated Discussion Panel
Ethical, Religious and Philosophical Dilemmas in Responding to COVID
George Chryssides, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom
Frank Ravitch, Michigan State University College of Law, United States
Brian Victoria, Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies, United Kingdom
Joseph Haldane, The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan (Moderator)

All times are Japan Standard Time (UTC+9)
Use our time converter tool to show times in your timezone.

12:00-13:40: Live-Stream Presentation Session 1
Room A: International Religion / Spirituality
62567 | Profiting from Polytheism: The Commodification of Mythical Beings During the Covid-19 Outbreak in Japan
62328 | A Dynamic Political Anthropology: Reframing Thomas Moore’s Spirituality
62925 | Religious Meanings in the Symbolic Functions of Food: Tunisia and Japan as Case Studies
56411 | An Analysis of Kierkegaard’s and Wittgenstein’s Notion of Faith

Room B: General Psychology
62296 | The Consumer Neuroscience of Phygital Retail Experiences
62719 | A Case of Sand Tray Experience with a Taiwanese High School Student who Infected COVID-19
62789 | Sense of Self and Agency in Schizophrenia: Illusions, Delusions, and Loci of Control
62303 | The Existence of Leader-Member Exchange in Supporting Millennials’ Work Meaningfulness in a Balance of Work and Personal Life

13:40-13:50: Break

13:50-15:05: Live-Stream Presentation Session 2
Room A: Philosophy - Philosophy and Religion
62748 | Compassion as Our Origins: Examining a Kyoto School Approach
55982 | A Critique on Nietzsche’s Critique on Christian Morality
62486 | Origen on the Will

Room B: Mental Health
62668 | Bloom Where Planted: The Inflorescence Model of Suicide Recovery Among Youths
62824 | Decreasing Mental Illness Stigma through Peer to Peer Socialization during an Mental Health Awareness Walk at an International University
61799 | Pathways of Resilience and Recovery From Trauma for Cambodian Young People

15:05-15:15: Break

15:15-16:30: Live-Stream Presentation Session 3
Room A: Ethics
62154 | The Ethics and Efficacy of Luxury Art as a Dimension of Corporate Social Responsibility
62380 | Exploring the Ethics of Bionationalism: Fact-value Dichotomies, Scientism, and Pseudoscience
62096 | Ethics in Higher Education Post Covid-19 Pandemic

Room B: General Psychology
62751 | Mapping a Nomological Network of Resilience
62478 | How Does (In)congruence in Perceived Child–parent Closeness Link to Chinese Children’s Socio-emotional Adjustment? The Mediating Role of Children’s Resilience
61913 | Discrete Emotions Caused by Episodic Future Thinking: A Systematic Review With Narrative Synthesis

16:30-16:40: Break

16:40-17:55: Live-Stream Presentation Session 4
Room A: International Ethics / Philosophy
62050 | NipponEthics Stakeholder Model – Understanding How Japanese Companies Manage Key Stakeholders
62439 | AI Ethics in Next Generation Wireless Networks: A Philosophical Outlook
55966 | Rights and Moral Objectivism in Watsuji Tetsuro’s Rinrigaku

Room B: Linguistics / Language
63060 | The Content of the Arabic Literature Textbooks and Developing Morals among Learners: Reality and Hope
62282 | Self-efficacy, SSI Learning Interest, SSI Critical Thinking Interest as Predictors of Students’ Reflection and Performance

All times are Japan Standard Time (UTC+9)
Use our time converter tool to show times in your timezone.

09:00-09:10: Announcements, Recognition of IAFOR Scholarship Winners, Welcome Address
Joseph Haldane, IAFOR, Japan

09:10-10:10: Panel Presentation
Helping Hands – Robotic Assistance in Supporting and Maintaining Social Interactions with Elders
Hee Rin Lee, Michigan State University, United States
James W. McNally, University of Michigan, United States & NACDA Program on Aging, United States
Keith W. Miller, University of Missouri – St. Louis, United States
Ryuji Yamazaki-Skov, Osaka University, Japan

10:10-10:20: Break

10:20-11:20: Panel Presentation
Missing You – Resilience, Renewal and Rebuilding Intergenerational Contact Within Families
Debbie Howard, Aging Matters International, Japan
James W. McNally, University of Michigan, United States & NACDA Program on Aging, United States
Lowell Sheppard, Never Too Late Academy, Japan

11:20-11:30: Break

11:30-12:30: Workshop Presentation
NACDA: Data on Aging Resources from Research Ideation to Long-Term Preservation and Sharing
James W. McNally, University of Michigan, United States & NACDA Program on Aging, United States
Kathryn Lavender, National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA), United States

12:30-12:50: Break

Room A: Aging and Gerontology
12:50-14:30: Live-Stream Presentation Session 1: Aging and Gerontology: Social Integration and Engagement
61733 | National Service for Seniors over Age 55 Leads to Significant Positive Health Outcomes
62867 | Does Intergenerational Support Affect Older People’s Social Participation? An Empirical Test from Chinese Elderly Population
62946 | The Importance of Social Integration and Engagement in Ensuring Older Adult Preparedness for an Endemic COVID-19
62664 | Explore Daily Dyadic Conversation Between Typical Older Adults and Partners in Community in Taiwan

14:30-14:40: Break

14:40-16:20: Live-Stream Presentation Session 2: Aging and Gerontology: Wellbeing
61750 | Grandparent’s Role as a Caregiver: The Impact on Life Satisfaction and Perceived Health Status of Grandparents in India
62035 | The Happy and the Not-so-happy: Discriminant Analysis of Retirees’ Wellbeing in Abu Dhabi
62864 | The Memory Lounge Project: Combatting Loneliness in Rural Queensland Through Intergenerational Connections and the Sharing of Memories
62939 | Risk and Protective Factors of Healthy Sexuality in Aging

16:20-16:30: Break

16:30-17:45: Live-Stream Presentation Session 3: Aging and Gerontology: Policy and Response
61747 | Ageing in a Multicultural Society: A Qualitative Study of Quality of Life Among the South Asian Older Adults in Hong Kong
62714 | Being Taken Care by Foreign Caregivers: Perspectives From Elderly Stroke Survivors in Taiwan
61871 | NCDs Risk Factors Among Nepalese Elders: How Prepared We Are?

17:45-17:55: Conference Closing Address

Room B: Psychology and Education
12:50-13:50: Featured Presentation
Perceived Stress of Students During Online Learning
Roswiyani Roswiyani, Tarumanagara University, Indonesia
Monty P. Satiadarma, Tarumanagara University, Indonesia

13:50-14:00: Break

14:00-15:40: Live-Stream Presentation Session 1: Psychology and Education
62930 | Teaching as Job or Altruism? Relationship of Teacher’s Motivation and Engagement–Based on Taiwan TALIS 2018
62959 | Parenting Self-perception During Pandemic COVID-19: Is There the Differences Between Full-time Working Mothers, Flexible-time Working Mothers, and Housewives on It?
63082 | Teachers’ Perspectives on Supporting Bereaved Students After the Death of a Parent
63083 | The COVID-19 Pandemic and Its Effects on Arab Teachers in Israel: A Mixed-methods Study

The above schedule may be subject to change.


Featured Presentations

  • Religion and COVID 19 in the U.S.: The Good, the Bad, and the Shocking
    Religion and COVID 19 in the U.S.: The Good, the Bad, and the Shocking
    Keynote Presentation: Frank S. Ravitch
  • Successful Prophecy? Jehovah’s Witnesses, Covid-19 and the War in Ukraine
    Successful Prophecy? Jehovah’s Witnesses, Covid-19 and the War in Ukraine
    Keynote Presentation: George D. Chryssides
  • The Rehabilitation of a Buddhist Heretic
    The Rehabilitation of a Buddhist Heretic
    Keynote Presentation: Brian Victoria
  • Ethical, Religious and Philosophical Dilemmas in Responding to COVID
    Ethical, Religious and Philosophical Dilemmas in Responding to COVID
    Plenary Panel
  • Responding to COVID: Trauma and Recovery
    Responding to COVID: Trauma and Recovery
    Plenary Panel
  • Building Resilience through Self-care: Art and Aesthetic Wellness
    Building Resilience through Self-care: Art and Aesthetic Wellness
    Featured Presentation: Amy Wai Sum Lee
  • Perceived Stress of Students During Online Learning
    Perceived Stress of Students During Online Learning
    Featured Presentation: Monty P. Satiadarma & Roswiyani Roswiyani

Virtual Presentations


Conference Programme

The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available online on February 28, 2022. All registered delegates will be notified of this publication by email.

*Please be aware that the above schedule may be subject to change.

Final Programme

The online version of the Conference Programme is now available to view below via the Issuu viewing platform. Alternatively, download a PDF version. The Conference Programme can also be viewed on the Issuu website (requires a web browser). An Issuu app is available for Android users.

The Conference Programme contains access information, session information and a detailed day-to-day presentation schedule.

Important Information Emails

All registered attendees will receive an Important Information email and updates in the run-up to the conference. Please check your email inbox for something from "iafor.org". If you can not find these emails in your normal inbox, it is worth checking in your spam or junk mail folders as many programs filter out emails this way. If these did end up in one of these folders, please add the address to your acceptable senders' folder by whatever method your email program can do this.


Previous Programming

View details of programming for past ACERP conferences via the links below.

Religion and COVID 19 in the U.S.: The Good, the Bad, and the Shocking
Keynote Presentation: Frank S. Ravitch

The responses to COVID-19 by religious individuals and entities in the United States have ranged from being scientifically informed, thoughtful, and balanced to endangering society. Similarly, the responses to religious concerns by government entities in the United States have ranged from scientifically sound while considering the needs of religious communities to pandering to certain religious communities in a manner that endangers society as a whole. Not surprisingly, much of this has coincided with the politicization of COVID in the United States. Thus, while the Jewish, Islamic, Buddhist and other religious communities have generally supported vaccination, masking, and social distancing (including holding services on Zoom), there has been a divide within Christianity. Most Christian denominations support vaccination, masking, and social distancing, but denominations associated more with social conservatism (for example, a large number of white Evangelicals) oppose vaccination, masking and distancing. Meanwhile, the response by state governments to religious vaccine exemptions and religious gatherings has varied from sincere attempts to accommodate religion with no or minimal harm to public health to subverting religion to public health concerns to pandering to conservative religious entities at the expense of public health.

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Successful Prophecy? Jehovah’s Witnesses, Covid-19 and the War in Ukraine
Keynote Presentation: George D. Chryssides

Jehovah’s Witnesses have acquired a reputation for making prophecies that have failed. In this presentation, it is argued that such accusations are unfair: on the contrary, they have denied themselves plausible opportunities to claim success. In December 2005, the front page of the Jehovah’s Witnesses’ Awake! magazine bore the heading: “The Next Global Pandemic – When?” Despite the Watch Tower Society’s interest in prophecy, they did not claim the Covid-19 pandemic as fulfilment of this warning, but as one of a number of signs that the end of the world’s present system is near. The King of the South, to whom the biblical prophet Daniel refers (Daniel 11: 5-13) is identified with Russia, and predicted to wage a large-scale war. Although such predictions could be used as examples of successful predictive prophecy, Jehovah’s Witnesses have merely regarded such catastrophes as signs that we are living in the earth’s last days. Instead of boasting successful prediction, Witnesses have prepared themselves for such disasters, and the presentation examines some of the ways in which they have anticipated natural and human disasters, and adapted their practices accordingly.

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The Rehabilitation of a Buddhist Heretic
Keynote Presentation: Brian Victoria

Unlike the Theravāda tradition, the Mahāyāna tradition of Buddhism allows Buddhist clerics, male or female, to regain their clerical status if they previously lost it due to having broken one or more of the four major rules of the clerical life, i.e. the four pārājikas (defeats). This possibility is included in the Māhāyana Brahmajāla Sūtra (J. Bonmō-kyō). While clerics who intentionally break one or more of the pārājikas are still subject to the loss of their clerical status, as Bernard Faure notes, “the culprit can now rehabilitate himself through his own repentance and through the merits of others.”

This presentation deals with one such cleric, a Sōtō Zen cleric by the name of Uchiyama Gudō (1874–1911), who lost his clerical status in 1909 and was subsequently hung to death by the Japanese government on January 24, 1911. It was not until April 1993, 84 years later, that Gudō’s clerical status was restored. The restoration occurred because the Sōtō Zen sect admitted Gudō “had been a victim of the national policy of that day.” In essence, the Sōtō Zen sect admitted it had erred in depriving Gudō of his clerical status in 1909 since he had violated government policy, not one of the pārājikas as charged. This presentation will focus on the process of Gudō’s rehabilitation in postwar Japan.

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Ethical, Religious and Philosophical Dilemmas in Responding to COVID
Plenary Panel

One of the most worrying aspects of the COVID pandemic was the “locking down” of huge swathes of the global population, for the general security of the population, for “their own good”. When China first responded to the coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan by incarcerating the whole of the city, it was an effective but shocking response. Many commentators opined that China might be able to do that, but in countries where freedoms of movement and assembly were societal cornerstones, surely that wouldn’t be possible. However, “lockdowns” quickly spread, and the ability of China to control its population through what amounted to mass incarceration was lauded as highly efficient, evidencing the superiority of an autocratic system in times of crisis.

Soon lockdowns were complemented by track and trace technologies that not only allowed, but mandated unprecedented invasions of privacy, justifying enormous data transfer between individuals and the government and private sector contractors.

Responding to COVID: Trauma and Recovery
Plenary Panel

The coronavirus pandemic had an enormous impact on the lives of billions of people simultaneously across the globe, disrupting and straining many of the relationships and support structures that are the sinews of society. Lockdowns exacerbated cases of loneliness and isolation, domestic abuse, and suicides, and shutdowns adversely affected huge economic losses. Many elderly died alone, while children lost precious months and years of the education so crucial to the building of lives. Fear and anxiety became prevalent as 2020 and 2021 became years of collective disruption and trauma. We are only just beginning to come to terms with the enormous ramifications of the pandemic and the first collective trauma of the globalised era.

In this plenary panel, a group of experts will look at the damage that has been done, as well as the lessons we might learn as we seek to recover.

Building Resilience through Self-care: Art and Aesthetic Wellness
Featured Presentation: Amy Wai Sum Lee

Into the second year of the pandemic, most educational institutes have made adjustments in order to continue the delivery of courses and programmes. Some regions have resumed a kind of normality and returned to face-to-face interaction for regular classes, and some regions may have adopted a hybrid mode to facilitate better reach to students. No matter what the actual implemented mechanism is, educators over the world have come to realise that rethinking “education” is necessary, in terms of the mode of delivery, as well as the value and kind of education we are offering to students. Besides reflecting on the mode and nature of education, another consensus among educators is the need to enhance students’ resilience, both in formal education and informal curriculum. This presentation is a proposal on building resilience of university students through co-curricular activities, focusing on self-care. Young people in the higher education sector are going through the threshold of adulthood, and this period is already full of challenges about personal identity and value. The pandemic is only a reminder to us of the importance of this core component for university students in their education. The proposal here is to use art as an indirect and informal learning experience to guide students to better self-care.

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Perceived Stress of Students During Online Learning
Featured Presentation: Monty P. Satiadarma & Roswiyani Roswiyani

Online learning has become one of the most prominent global issues related to COVID-19, and many students who have never experienced an online learning program have been forced to adapt to a new system. The students perceive the program as stressful for a number of reasons, including limited networking facilities and social interactions. Some students described the stress with complaints of physical symptoms. One hundred seventy-seven (177) students participated in this research. 32 male students and 145 female students (age 17-23 years) responded to PSS (Perceived Stress Scale by Cohen et al, 1983), and results indicate that mostly freshmen (age 17-18) experienced moderate levels of stress, followed by sophomores (age 19-20). Moderate levels of stress were experienced by 69% of female and 71% of male students, and high levels of stress were experienced by 26% of female and 21% of male students. Most students did not report any medical problems; however, the most medical complaints related to their perceived stress were digestive problems (6.78% reported moderate perceived stress levels, and 3.38% reported high perceived stress levels). Qualitative data based on individual interviews have been included for further consideration.

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