Programme (Live-Stream)

The Asian Conference on Ethics, Religion & Philosophy (ACERP) is an interdisciplinary conference held alongside The Asian Conference on Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences (ACP). Keynote, Featured and Spotlight Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. Registration for either conference will allow participants to attend sessions in both.

This page provides details of presentations and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.

Due to continued uncertainties surrounding the ongoing global coronavirus pandemic, ACERP2020 will be held Online.

Conference Outline

Friday, March 27, 2020Saturday, March 28, 2020Sunday, March 29, 2020

Watch and participate via Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/591856356
Meeting ID: 591856356

All times are Japan Standard Time (UTC+9)

10:30-10:45: Welcome Address & Recognition of IAFOR Scholarship Winners (Online via Zoom)
Joseph Haldane, IAFOR, Japan

10:45-11:25: Featured Presentation (Online via Zoom)
Religious Complicity and LGBTQ Rights
Frank S. Ravitch, Michigan State University College of Law, USA

11:25-11:35: Break

11:35-12:15: Keynote Presentation (Online via Zoom)
Dialectical Behavior Therapy – Its Relevance for Japan in Social Transition
Mie Takaki, DBT Tokyo, Japan

12:15-12:30: IAFOR Documentary Photography Award (Online via Zoom)

12:30-13:45: Lunch Break

13:45-14:25: Featured Presentation (Online via Zoom)
Helping a Stranger in Japan: Who Helps and Why?
Yu Niiya, Hosei University, Japan

14:25-14:35: Break

14:35-15:15: Keynote Presentation (Online via Zoom)
Embracing Difference: Religious Diversity in the UK
Stephen E. Gregg, University of Wolverhampton, UK

15:15-15:30: Break

15:30-16:45: Online Session I: Linguistics/Language & Psychology/Behavioral Science

Positive and Negative Support Concerning Prenatal Testing in Japan
Miyako Kimura, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Japan

Picture Book Review Mining of Infants’ Developmental Order
Miho Kasamatsu, University of Tsukuba, Japan
Takehito Utsuro, University of Tsukuba, Japan
Yu Saito, Seitoku University, Japan
Yumiko Ishikawa, Utsunomiya University, Japan

The Structure of Emotion Concepts in Japanese Revealed Through the Relationship Between Emotional Situations and Emotion Words
Mariko Kikutani, Kanazawa University, Japan
Machiko Ikemoto, Doshisha University, Japan
Mariko Shirai, Doshisha University, Japan

16:45-17:00: Break

17:00-18:40: Online Session II: Education & Neuroscience

Junior High School Students who are Extroverted and Lonely Prefer SNS – Analysis of SNS Time by Diary Method
Shiroh Ohno, The University of Tokyo, Japan

Factors in Teachers’ Help-seeking Preferences: From the viewpoint of teachers with new appointment terms
Yutaka Konuma, Hokkaido University of Education, Japan

The Difference of the ‘Regression in the Service of the Ego’ Between Art Students and Professional Artists
Toshiki Ito, Kobe University, Japan

The Pontine Region is Involved in Early Visual Affective Processing
Jingjun Wong, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Dorita H. F. Chang, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Di Qi, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Weiwei Men, Peking University, China
Jia-Hong Gao, Peking University, China
Tatia M. C. Lee, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Watch and participate via Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/974223453
Meeting ID: 974223453

All times are Japan Standard Time (UTC+9)

09:00-10:20: Keynote Workshop (Online via Zoom)
Aging Data: NACDA & an Open-source Repository
James W. McNally, University of Michigan & NACDA Program on Aging, USA

10:20-10:30: Break

10:30-11:45: Aging & Gerontology: Online Session I

12:00-13:40: Aging & Gerontology: Online Session II

13:40-14:00: Break

14:00-15:15: Online Session I: Religion
Drawing Wisdom to Combat Global Crisis: Two Spiritual Responses to Climate Change
Nathan Garcia, Oblate School of Theology, United States
Benjamin PowerGriffin, Oblate School of Theology, United States

Utilising Metaphors at the End of Life and the Importance of an Expansive View on Spiritual Care for LGBTQI+ Patients
Jane Francis, Mater Health, Mater Misericordiae Ltd, Brisbane, Australia

Privacy in Islamic Eschatology and the Journey to the Divine
Ghada Mohamad, American University in the Emirates, United Arab Emirates

15:15-15:30: Break

15:30-17:10: Online Session II: Qualitative/Quantitative Research in any other area of Psychology
Psychological Safety in Teams: Essentials to Developing High Performance and Continual Learning Teams
Kenneth Tan, Singapore Management University, Singapore
Wai Kit Ng, Certisgroup, Singapore

Smartphones at the Workplace: An in situ Mixed-Method Study on Smartphone use During Intellectual Work
Maxi Heitmayer, London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom

Attention Functions in Time Estimation
Irene Diamant, The Academic College of Tel Aviv Jaffa, Israel
Dan Zakay, IDC, Israel

The Ethics of Qualitative Video Research: A Comprehensive Overview of the State of the Art and Prospective Solutions
Maxi Heitmayer, London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom
Marina Everri, University College Dublin, Ireland
Paulius Yamin-Slotkus, London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom
Saadi Lahlou, London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom

Watch and participate via Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/721184536
Meeting ID: 721184536

All times are Japan Standard Time (UTC+9)

10:00-11:15: Online Session I - Mental Health
Perceived Loneliness and Brain Structural Changes in Older Adults with Late-Life Depression
LL Emily Sin, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Tatia M.C. Lee, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

The Relationship Between Rumination and Metacognition: Application of an Innovative Signal-detection Approach
Barbara Chuen Yee Lo, Lingnan University, Hong Kong
Alan Lap Fai Lee, Lingnan University, Hong Kong
Chak Man Tang, Lingnan University, Hong Kong

The Mediating Effect of Religiousness/Spirituality on Perceived Stress-life Satisfaction Relationship
Sahara Iman Alonto, De La Salle University, Philippines

11:15-11:30: Break

11:30-12:45: Online Session II - Mental Health

Health Consideration in Architectural Design: An Interrelation Between Architecture and Neuroscience
Dea Luma, The University of Tokyo, Japan
Yoshiyuki Kawazoe, The University of Tokyo, Japan

Exploring the Link Between Athletic Identity, Self-compassion, Communication, and Mental Toughness of Table Tennis Student Athletes
Maridette Joyce Maranan, University of Santo Tomas, Philippines
Arnulfo Lopez, University of Santo Tomas, Philippines

Sailing Through: The Assessment of a Philippine Grief Support Program Using Bible-Based Lessons and Art Therapy
Alyssa Publico, University of the Philippines, Philippines

12:45-13:00: Break

13:00-14:15: Online Session III - Religion

The Teaching of Religious Knowledge in Secondary Schools in Hong Kong
Yau Yung Tsang, CMA Choi Cheung Kok Secondary School, Hong Kong

Integration and Translation: A Comparative Study of Caodaism in Vietnam and Yi-Kuan-Tao
Lim Pey Huan, National ChengChi University, Taiwan

Reflection on Mādhyamika Philosophy and Japanese Buddhism
Namramita Bhuiya, Kishore Bharati Bhagini Nivedita (co-ed) College, India

The above schedule may be subject to change.


Featured Presentations

  • Embracing Difference: Religious Diversity in the UK
    Embracing Difference: Religious Diversity in the UK
    Keynote Presentation: Stephen Gregg
  • Religious Complicity and LGBTQ Rights
    Religious Complicity and LGBTQ Rights
    Keynote Presentation: Frank S. Ravitch
  • Helping a stranger in Japan: Who helps and why?
    Helping a stranger in Japan: Who helps and why?
    Featured Presentation: Yu Niiya
  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy – Its Relevance for Japan in Social Transition
    Dialectical Behavior Therapy – Its Relevance for Japan in Social Transition
    Featured Presentation: Mie Takaki

Virtual Presentations


Final Programme

The online version of the Conference Programme is now available to view below via the Issuu viewing platform. Alternatively, download a PDF version. The Conference Programme can also be viewed on the Issuu website (requires a web browser). An Issuu app is available for Android users.

The Conference Programme contains session information and a detailed day-to-day presentation schedule.


Previous Programming

View details of programming for past ACERP conferences via the links below.

Embracing Difference: Religious Diversity in the UK
Keynote Presentation: Stephen Gregg

Tolerance for religious diversity is a core message in recent Governmental and Educational initiatives in the United Kingdom, along with a major component of British “soft power” in international relations. This presentation looks beyond the “brand” of multiculturalism/diverse heritage of the modern UK to understand religious identities beyond essentialising and reductive categories of membership or belonging. Using a Lived Religion approach, which preferences people above texts and practices above beliefs, I will survey recent UK equalities legislation, and discuss the effect this has had on everyday lived reality for religious individuals and communities. I will analyse census data and raise issues relating to the rise of the “religious nones”, the muted voices of minority religions, and the debate over Britain as a “Christian country”. I will focus on diversity within, as well as between, religions and ask why some communities are embraced more than others, and reflect upon the problem of tolerating intolerance.

Read presenters' biography
Religious Complicity and LGBTQ Rights
Keynote Presentation: Frank S. Ravitch

The relationship between religious complicity claims and discrimination against members of the LGBTQ community has been explored quite a bit in the last few years. This talk will focus on the supposed conflict between religious complicity claims and LGBTQ rights, especially transgender rights and same-sex marriage in the United States, and the relative lack of such complicity claims in Japan where cultural objections to same-sex marriage are used more often than religious ones, and where some transgender rights are more recognized than in the United States. The talk will argue for a contextual approach to these issues in the United States. That approach would legally protect religious complicity claims in some situations, but not others, and would consider who (or what sort of entity) is making the complicity claim as well as the nature of the harm legal protection of the complicity claim would inflict on members of the LGBTQ community. In Japan, the contextual approach has benefits as well; although it is less clear how it might work in the Japanese legal system.

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Helping a stranger in Japan: Who helps and why?
Featured Presentation: Yu Niiya

Renowned for its hospitality, Japan is getting ready for more omotenashi as it prepares for the Olympic and Paralympic games. However, is Japan really a helpful nation? Are the Japanese compassionate people? This presentation provides evidence that, in Japan, the decision to help a stranger depends heavily on what the situation dictates. To avoid the embarrassment of appearing meddlesome, the Japanese are less likely to intervene when the need of help is ambiguous, rather than clear. Further research shows that people who pursue compassionate goals to support others’ well-being are more likely to help, whereas those who pursue the goals to avoid projecting a negative image of the self are less likely to help. These findings suggest that helping could be promoted by encouraging people to shift their focus from questioning “what will I get?” to “what can I give?” Additionally, I will present recent findings that suggest that despite spending more time on others, those with compassionate goals experience greater time affluence and subjective well-being. The more strongly people pursue the goals to support others, the more they offer help and the happier they are.

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Dialectical Behavior Therapy – Its Relevance for Japan in Social Transition
Featured Presentation: Mie Takaki

Japan is not immune from the global trend of tensions between the acceptance of diversity, the rejection of it, or the ambivalence in between. Emerging recognition of LGBTQ rights (Chi, 2016; Tamagawa, 2018), the shift in gender roles and lifestyle choices (Kanomata, 2012), the rise of intercultural marriage and the number of children born into to these families (Takeda, 2008), the increase of Japanese with a global perspective (Ota, 2011), or increasing number of foreign workers and students in cultural and linguistic adjustment processes (Ishikawa, 2014; Niikura, 2008) in a still largely conformist, monoculture, monolinguistic, inward-looking communities are examples of the tensions. The tensions seem to amplify invalidations experienced by individuals who identify themselves as minorities in the transforming society, which in turn increase their emotional vulnerability.

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT)’s biosocial theory posits transactions between an invalidating environment and an individual’s emotional vulnerability as the factor for the development of borderline personality disorder (Linehan, 1993). In this presenter’s clinical work over the past four years in Tokyo produced enough samples to hypothesize that some, if not all, traits of BPD are present among these minority individuals. They are: a) affective lability especially of anger, b) chaotic relationships and chronic interpersonal crises, c) difficulties with sense of self, d) self-harm and other impulsive behaviors, and e) dissociative responses in stress situations (Linehan, 1993). DBT was effective to work with these individuals with its dialectical worldview (D) to understand and validate their private experiences; behavior procedures (B) that balances acceptance of emotional pain and change of problematic behaviors; and therapeutic relationship (T) that is genuine and equal.

Read presenters' biography